Working Well with Babies

Working Well with Babies

Comprehensive Competencies for Educators of Infants and Toddlers

Claire D. Vallotton, Holly Brophy-Herb, Lori Roggman, Rachel Chazan-Cohen

$44.95

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Description

&lt;i>Working Well with Babies&lt;/i> describes the comprehensive competencies (including the knowledge, dispositions, and skills) that educators of infants and toddlers must have to provide optimal support for infants and toddlers. Designed as a learning resource for both in-service and pre-service infant/toddler practitioners, this text details the nine competency dimensions of infant/toddler educators developed by the Collaborative for Understanding the Pedagogy of Infant/Toddler Development (CUPID). <br><br>The nine competencies are <br>1. Reflective Practice 2. Building and Supporting Relationships<br> 3. Partnering with and Supporting Diverse Families<br> 4. Guiding Infant and Toddler Behavior<br> 5. Supporting Development and Learning<br> 6. Assessing Behavior, Development, & Environments<br> 7. Including Infants and Toddlers with Special Needs<br> 8. Professionalism<br> 9. Mentoring, Leadership, and Supporting Competencies in Adults <br><br>Supplemental appendices include rich and well-organized information to build core knowledge of development over the first three years and apply this knowledge to practice. Reproducibles designed to enhance active and engaged learning are organized by chapter and provide examples, reflective exercises, and information to share with families.


Author

Claire D. Vallotton:
Claire D. Vallotton, PhD, Associate Professor of Human Development &amp; Family Studies, Michigan State University, is a scientist of human development, helping the world better understand babies, and support their parents and educators. Claire is passionate about high-quality teaching and leads the Collaborative for Understanding the Pedagogy of Infant/Toddler Development (CUPID), a group of more than 50 scholars across universities and other organizations that aims to better prepare the infant/toddler workforce. &lt;br>&lt;br>Holly Brophy-Herb, Ph.D., Professor of Human Development &amp; Family Studies, Michigan State University, studies how parents/teachers socialize very young children&#39;s emotions, and how emotion socialization practices relate to early social-emotional development.&lt;br>&lt;br>Lori Roggman, Ph.D., Professor of Human Development at Utah State University, focuses her research on how parents support their child’s early development and how effective home visiting practices promote developmental parenting. She began her career as a home visitor, eventually developing a research program studying infant development in the context of caregiving relationships and evaluating home visitation impacts related to recommend practices.&lt;br>&lt;br>Rachel Chazan-Cohen, Ph.D., Visiting Professor, Tufts University, and Senior Research Fellow at Child Trends, is particularly interested in the biological, relational, and environmental factors influencing the development of at-risk children and, most especially, on the creation, evaluation, and refinement of intervention programs for families with infants and toddlers. |||Claire D. Vallotton, PhD, Associate Professor of Human Development &amp; Family Studies, Michigan State University, is a scientist of human development, helping the world better understand babies, and support their parents and educators. Claire is passionate about high-quality teaching and leads the Collaborative for Understanding the Pedagogy of Infant/Toddler Development (CUPID), a group of more than 50 scholars across universities and other organizations that aims to better prepare the infant/toddler workforce. &lt;br>&lt;br>Holly Brophy-Herb, Ph.D., Professor of Human Development &amp; Family Studies, Michigan State University, studies how parents/teachers socialize very young children&#39;s emotions, and how emotion socialization practices relate to early social-emotional development.&lt;br>&lt;br>Lori Roggman, Ph.D., Professor of Human Development at Utah State University, focuses her research on how parents support their child’s early development and how effective home visiting practices promote developmental parenting. She began her career as a home visitor, eventually developing a research program studying infant development in the context of caregiving relationships and evaluating home visitation impacts related to recommend practices.&lt;br>&lt;br>Rachel Chazan-Cohen, Ph.D., Visiting Professor, Tufts University, and Senior Research Fellow at Child Trends, is particularly interested in the biological, relational, and environmental factors influencing the development of at-risk children and, most especially, on the creation, evaluation, and refinement of intervention programs for families with infants and toddlers. |||Claire D. Vallotton, PhD, Associate Professor of Human Development &amp; Family Studies, Michigan State University, is a scientist of human development, helping the world better understand babies, and support their parents and educators. Claire is passionate about high-quality teaching and leads the Collaborative for Understanding the Pedagogy of Infant/Toddler Development (CUPID), a group of more than 50 scholars across universities and other organizations that aims to better prepare the infant/toddler workforce. &lt;br>&lt;br>Holly Brophy-Herb, Ph.D., Professor of Human Development &amp; Family Studies, Michigan State University, studies how parents/teachers socialize very young children&#39;s emotions, and how emotion socialization practices relate to early social-emotional development.&lt;br>&lt;br>Lori Roggman, Ph.D., Professor of Human Development at Utah State University, focuses her research on how parents support their child’s early development and how effective home visiting practices promote developmental parenting. She began her career as a home visitor, eventually developing a research program studying infant development in the context of caregiving relationships and evaluating home visitation impacts related to recommend practices.&lt;br>&lt;br>Rachel Chazan-Cohen, Ph.D., Visiting Professor, Tufts University, and Senior Research Fellow at Child Trends, is particularly interested in the biological, relational, and environmental factors influencing the development of at-risk children and, most especially, on the creation, evaluation, and refinement of intervention programs for families with infants and toddlers. |||Claire D. Vallotton, PhD, Associate Professor of Human Development &amp; Family Studies, Michigan State University, is a scientist of human development, helping the world better understand babies, and support their parents and educators. Claire is passionate about high-quality teaching and leads the Collaborative for Understanding the Pedagogy of Infant/Toddler Development (CUPID), a group of more than 50 scholars across universities and other organizations that aims to better prepare the infant/toddler workforce. &lt;br>&lt;br>Holly Brophy-Herb, Ph.D., Professor of Human Development &amp; Family Studies, Michigan State University, studies how parents/teachers socialize very young children&#39;s emotions, and how emotion socialization practices relate to early social-emotional development.&lt;br>&lt;br>Lori Roggman, Ph.D., Professor of Human Development at Utah State University, focuses her research on how parents support their child’s early development and how effective home visiting practices promote developmental parenting. She began her career as a home visitor, eventually developing a research program studying infant development in the context of caregiving relationships and evaluating home visitation impacts related to recommend practices.&lt;br>&lt;br>Rachel Chazan-Cohen, Ph.D., Visiting Professor, Tufts University, and Senior Research Fellow at Child Trends, is particularly interested in the biological, relational, and environmental factors influencing the development of at-risk children and, most especially, on the creation, evaluation, and refinement of intervention programs for families with infants and toddlers. 

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